On Rare Occasions..

On Saturday, May 17, 2014 11:24 AM, Al Bates <veryoleman@hdiss.net> wrote:

(Sidebar).

In reference to Barack Obama’s signature legislation…

Obama care 3

Continuing… Subject: Fwd: Inpatient or outpatient. Be careful…

Letter from a senior gentleman in Mesa, Arizona: …

Dear Family, Friends, Neighbors and former Classmates, I just found myself in the middle of a medical situation that made it very clear that “the affordable care act” is neither affordable, nor do they care.

I’ll go back about seven years ago to a fairly radical prostate surgery that I underwent. The Urologist (a personal friend) who performed the surgery was very concerned that it was cancer, though I wasn’t told this until the lab report revealed it was benign. Since that procedure, I have experienced numerous urinary tract infections, UTI’s. Since I had never had a “UTI” prior to the prostate surgery, I assume that it is one of the side effects from surgery, an assumption since confirmed by my Family Doctor.

The weekend of March 8-9, I was experiencing all the symptoms of another bout of UTI. By Monday afternoon the infection had hit with full force. Knowing that all I needed was an antibiotic, I went to an Urgent Care Center in Mesa, AZ., to provide a specimen, a requirement for getting the prescription. After waiting 45 min. to see the Doctor, I started getting very nauseous and light headed. I went to the Receptionist to ask where the bathroom was as I felt that I was going to throw up. I was told that I would have to wait for the Doctor because I would need to leave a specimen and they didn’t want me in the bathroom without first seeing him.

That was when the lights went out, my next awareness was that of finding myself on the floor (in the waiting room) having violent dry heaves, and very confused. At this point, I tried to stand up but couldn’t make it, and they made it very clear they weren’t going to let me get up until the ambulance got there. By the way, when you’re waiting to see the Doctor and you pass out, you get very prompt attention. Now, “the rest of the story”, and the reason for sending this to so many of you.

I was taken to the nearest hospital, to emergency. Once there, I was transported to an emergency examination room. Once I had removed my clothes and donned one of those lovely hospital gowns, I finally got to see a Doctor. I asked “what is going on” I’m just having a UTI, just get me the proper medication and let me go home. He told me that my symptoms presented the possibility of sepsis, a potentially deadly migration of toxins, and that they needed to run several tests to determine how far the infection had migrated.

For the next 3 hours I was subjected to several tests, blood draws, EKG’s, and demands for specimens At about 7:30 the nurse came back to my room to inform me that one of the tests takes 1- 2 days to complete, I asked if they (the results) could be emailed, at which point she informed me that I wouldn’t need them emailed because I wasn’t going anywhere. I started arguing with her but was told, “if you don’t start behaving, I’ll start taking your temperature rectally, at which point I became a perfect gentleman. I did tell her I wanted to see the doctor because I had no intention of staying overnight.

Now, this is what I want each of you to understand, please read these next sentences carefully. The doctor finally came in to inform me that he was going to admit me. I said, “are you admitting me for treatment or for observation?” He told me that I would be admitted for observation. I said Doctor, correct me if I’m wrong, but if you admit me for observation my Medicare will not pay anything, this due to the affordable care act , he said that’s right, it won’t. I then grabbed for my bag of clothing and said, then I’m going home. He said you’re really too sick to be going home, but I understand your position, this health program is going to hit seniors especially hard.

The doctor then left the room and I started getting dressed, I was just getting ready to put my shoes on when another doctor (the closer) came into the room, he saw me dressed and said, “where do you think you are going?” I simply said “I’m going home, to which he replied, quite vociferously, no you aren’t. I said, “Doc, you and I both know that under the “affordable care act” anyone on Medicare who is admitted to a hospital for observation will be responsible for the bill, Medicare won’t pay a cent”. At which point he nodded in affirmation. I said, “You will either admit me for a specific treatment or you won’t admit me.” Realizing he wasn’t going to win this one, he said he would prepare my release papers.

A few minutes later the discharge nurse came to my room to have me sign the necessary papers, relieving them from any responsibility. I told her I wasn’t trying to be obstinate, but I wasn’t going to be burdened with the full (financial) responsibility for my hospital stay. After making sure the door was closed, she said, “I don’t blame you at all, I would do the same thing.” She went on to say, “You wouldn’t believe the people who elect to leave for the same reasons, people who are deathly sick, people who have to be wheeled out on a gurney.” She further said, “The ‘Affordable Care Act’ is going to be a disaster for seniors. Yet, if you are in this country illegally, and have no coverage, you will be covered in full.”

This is not internet hype folks, this is real, I just experienced it personally. Moving right along, this gets worse.

Today I went to a (required) follow up appointment with my Arizona Family Practitioner. Since my white count was pretty high, the follow up was important. During the visit I shared the experience at emergency, and that I had refused to be admitted. His response was “I don’t blame you at all, I would have done the same thing”. He went on to say that the colonoscopy and other procedures are probably going to be dropped from coverage for those over 70.

I told him that I had heard that the affordable care act would no longer pay for cancer treatment for those 76 and older, is that true? His understanding is that it is true.

Obama care - Constitution 2a

The more I hear, and experience the Affordable Care Act, the more I’m beginning to see that we seniors are nothing more than an inconvenience, and the sooner they can get rid of us the better off they’ll be.

no to Obama care 1

November is coming folks, we can have an impact on this debacle by letting everyone in Congress know that their responsibility is to the constituents, not the president and not the lobbyists. We need to let them ALL know that they are in office to serve and to look after the BEST INTERESTS of “we the people”, their employers, and not to become self serving bureaucrats who serve only out of greed. And if they don’t seem to understand this simple logic, we’ll fire them.

On the mend, ..thank you.

Please remember, if you’re on Social Security and Medicare demand that your hospital admission is for a treatment,…

“NOT for OBSERVATION!”

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Going beyond what is provided in the Mesa, Arizona senior’s letter above, I am providing you with…

CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES

Are You a Hospital Inpatient or Outpatient? …

If You Have Medicare – Ask!

Did you know that even if you stay in the hospital overnight, you might still be considered an “outpatient”?

Your hospital status (whether the hospital considers you an “inpatient” or “outpatient”) affects how much you pay for hospital services (like X-rays, drugs, and lab tests) and may also affect whether Medicare will cover care you get in a skilled nursing facility (SNF).

You’re an inpatient starting the day you’re formally admitted to the hospital withal doctor’s order. The day before you’re discharged is your last inpatient day.

You’re an outpatient if you’re getting emergency department services, observation services, outpatient surgery, lab tests, or X-rays, and the doctor hasn’t written an order to admit you to the hospital as an inpatient. In these cases, you’re an outpatient even if you spend the night at the hospital.

Note: Observation services are hospital outpatient services given to help the doctor decide if the patient needs to be admitted as an inpatient or can be discharged. Observation services may be given in the Emergency Department (ED) or another area of the hospital.

If you’re in the hospital for more than a few hours always ask your doctor or the hospital staff if you’re an inpatient or an outpatient.

If you have a Medicare advantage plan, (an HMO or PPO), cost and coverage may be different. Check with your plan.

What do (you) pay as an inpatient?

Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) covers inpatient hospital services. Generally this means you pay a one-time deductible for all of your hospital services for the first 60 days you’re in the hospital.

Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) covers most of your doctor services when you’re an inpatient. You pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount for doctor services after paying the Part B deductible.

What do (you) pay as an outpatient?

Medicare Part B covers outpatient hospital services. Generally, this means you pay a copayment for each individual outpatient hospital service. This amount may vary by service.

Note: The copayment for a single outpatient hospital service can’t be more than the inpatient hospital deductible.

However, your total copayment for all outpatient services may be more than the inpatient hospital deductible.

Part B also covers most of your doctor services when you’re a hospital outpatient. You pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount after you pay the Part B deductible.

Generally the prescription and over-the-counter drugs you get in an outpatient setting (like an emergency department), sometimes called “self-administered drugs,” aren’t covered by Part B.

Also, for safety reasons, many hospitals have policies that don’t allow patients to bring prescription or other drugs from home.

If you have Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D), these drugs may be covered under certain circumstances.

You likely will need to pay out-of-pocket for these drugs and submit a claim to your drug plan for a refund.

Call your plan for more information.

For more detailed information on how Medicare covers hospital services, including premiums, deductibles, and copayments, visitwww.medicare.gov/publications to view the “Medicare & You” handbook.

You can also call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227). TTY users should call1-877-486-2048.

Truth forges understanding, I’ll be back…

Crusader Rabbit Logo - COLOR 1a

Crusader Rabbit…

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