Wisdom from History, Andrew Jackson..

Pres. Andrew Jackson 1a

Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845) was the seventh President of the United States (1829–1837).

Based in frontier Tennessee, Jackson was a politician and army general who defeated the Creek Indians at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend (1814), and the British at the Battle of New Orleans (1815).

we the people page break 4

(Sidebar).

Of course it’s unorthodox to throw the lyrics of the song into the critique of an American president, ..but then when did I ever proclaim that I was Orthodox?

According to Webster: “or·tho·dox,” (in context)  Adhering to what is commonly accepted, customary, or traditional.

Johnny Horton on stage 2a

“The Battle of New Orleans” is a song written by Jimmy Driftwood. The song describes the 1815 Battle of New Orleans from the perspective of an American soldier; the song tells the tale of the battle with a light tone and provides a rather comical version of what actually happened at the battle. It has been recorded by many artists, but the singer most often associated with this song is Johnny Horton. His version scored number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1959.

Lyrics…

(Banjo lead-in)…

the Battle of New Orleans - pai

In 1814 we took a little trip
Along with Colonel Jackson down the mighty Mississip
We took a little bacon and we took a little beans
And we caught the bloody British in a town in New Orleans

We fired our guns and the British kept a-comin’
There wasn’t nigh as many as there was a while ago
We fired once more and they begin to runnin’
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico
(One-two-three, with a-one-two-three)

We looked down the river
(Hut-two)
And we see’d the British come
(Three-four)
And there must have been a hundred of ’em
(Hut-two)
Beatin’ on the drums
(Three-four)
They stepped so high
(Hut-two)
And they made their bugles ring
(Three-four)
We stood beside our cotton bales
(Hut-two)
And didn’t say a thing
(Two-three-four)

We fired our guns and the British kept a-comin’
There wasn’t nigh as many as there was a while ago
We fired once more and they begin to runnin’
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

Old Hickory said we could take ’em by surprise
(One-hut, two-three-four)
If we didn’t fire our muskets
(One-hut, two-three-four)
‘Till we looked ’em in the eye
(One-hut, two-three-four)
We held our fire
(Hut, two-three-four)
‘Till we see’d their faces well
Then we opened up our squirrel guns
And really gave ’em – well we

Fired our guns and the British kept a-comin’
There wasn’t nigh as many as there was a while ago
We fired once more and they begin to runnin’
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

Yeah, they ran through the briars
(One-hup-two)
And they ran through the brambles
(Hup-two-three-four)
And they ran through the bushes
(Hup-two)
Where a rabbit couldn’t go
(Hup-two-three-four)
They ran so fast
(Hup-two)
That the hounds couldn’t catch ’em
(One-two-three-four)
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico
(One-two, hup-two-three-four)

We fired our cannon ’til the barrel melted down
So we grabbed an alligator and we fought another round
We filled his head with cannon balls, and powdered his behind
And when we touched the powder off the gator lost his mind

We fired our guns and the British kept a-comin’
There wasn’t nigh as many as there was a while ago
We fired once more and they begin to runnin’
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico

Yeah, they ran through the briars
(Hup-one-two)
And they ran through the brambles
(One-two-three-four)
And they ran through the bushes
(Hup-two)
Where a rabbit couldn’t go
(Hup-two-three-four)
They ran so fast
(Hup-two)
That the hounds couldn’t catch ’em
(One-two-three-four)
On down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico
(One-two, hup-two-three-four)

Hut-two-three-four
Sound off, three-four
Hut-two-three-four
Sound off, three-four
Hut-two-three-four
Hut-two-three-four.

The Battle of New Orleans has always been one of my favorite (fun) songs, how about you?

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Continuing…

A polarizing figure who dominated the Second Party System in the 1820s and 1830s, as president he dismantled the Second Bank of the United States…

$20 gold certificate 1

(Twenty Dollar Gold Certificate). 

For those of you out there who have most likely never seen one?

Continuing…

..and initiated forced relocation and resettlement of Native American tribes from the Southeast to west of the Mississippi River.

His enthusiastic followers created the modern Democratic Party. The 1830–1850 period later became known as the era of Jacksonian democracy.

Jackson was nicknamed “Old Hickory” because of his toughness and aggressive personality; he fought in duels, some fatal to his opponents.

(Sidebar).

Barack and Bo 1

 (Don’t worry Bo, ..this car is bullet proof).

How many of you reading my blather today could imagine Barack Obama facing an opponent with a dueling pistol?

Continuing…

Jackson was a wealthy slaveholder. He fought politically against what he denounced as a closed, undemocratic aristocracy, adding to his appeal to common citizens. He expanded the (spoils system) during his presidency to strengthen his political base.

(Sidebar).

The Spoils System…

to the victors go the spoils 1a

 In the politics of the United States, a spoil system (also known as a patronage system) is a practice where a political party, after winning an election, gives government jobs to its voters as a reward for working toward victory, and as an incentive to keep working for the party—as opposed to a merit system, where offices are awarded on the basis of some measure of merit, independent of political activity. The term was derived from the phrase “to the victor go the spoils” by New York Senator William L. Marcy, referring to the victory of the Jackson Democrats in the election of 1828. (Source Wikipedia).

Continuing…

Elected president in 1828, Jackson supported a (small and limited) federal government. He strengthened the power of the presidency, which he saw as spokesman for the entire population, as opposed to Congressmen from a specific small district.

He was supportive of states’ rights, but during the Nullification Crisis, declared that states do not have the right to nullify federal laws.

Strongly against the national bank, he vetoed the renewal of its charter and ensured its collapse.

Whigs and moralists denounced his aggressive enforcement of the Indian Removal Act, which resulted in the forced relocation of thousands of Native Americans to Indian Territory (now Oklahoma).

Historians acknowledge his protection of popular democracy and individual liberty for United States citizens, but criticize him for his support for slavery and for his role in Indian removal.(Source Wikipedia).

Andrew Jackson was a man’s man, he understood what makes the world go around.

“The duty of government is to leave commerce to its own capital and credit as well as all other branches of business, protecting all in their legal pursuits, granting exclusive privileges to none.”

Andrew Jackson.

He also understood God’s role in life…

“The Bible is the rock on which this Republic rests.”

Andrew Jackson.

Editorial: If Barack Obama and his Marxist socialist (commie) ilk achieve their goals, God will vanish from America, ..along with the rock America depends on.

burning the Bible 1

Burning the Holy Bible is not a virtue of a true American, any more than burning the American flag is freedom of speech.

Truth forges understanding, I’ll be back tomorrow

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Crusader Rabbit…

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